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Why Do You Crave Sugar?

crave sugar

Why Do You Crave Sugar?

Contrary to what some of us would like to believe, none of us are born with a sweet tooth. Sugar cravings are the undoing of many people’s new years resolutions, the driver behind sneaking a brownie with your coffee, and the leading cause of entire blocks of chocolate disappear ingin one sitting. From the physiological to the psychological, there are several factors at play when it comes to sugar cravings, and the consequences of consuming too much sugar can be dire.

So, why do some people just seem to always crave sugar? You’reeating your emotions Stress eating is experienced by most people at some point in their lives, and sugar fiends aren’t immune. When you’re stressed, your body releases cortisol, otherwise known as ‘the stress hormone’. When your body is stressed, it uses more energy as your sympathetic nervous system is activated and in overdrive, so you look for the quickest energy boost you can find–sugar.

The link between sugar cravings and emotions is also found in people experiencing depression. When we consume sugar, our serotonin levels–otherwise known as ‘the happy hormone’–increase. So, when we’re looking for that dose of serotonin, sugar is often the quickest source. You’re not eating enough of the good stuff People with poor eating habits tend to be lacking in one or more nutritional areas, leaving the body to play catch-up on refuelling its energy stores to keep functioning.

In a fast-paced world with ever-increasing energy demands, some people go to the quickest and most convenient way to restore that energy–you guessed it. Sugar. Refined sugar gives the body a big energy spike, but what goes up must come down,  and the body comes down hard and fast. After the energy spike comes the fast drop, and people often try to remedy this by eating more sugar, creating a vicious cycle of highs and lows and nonstop sugar cravings.

You’re a creature of habit Habits can be good and bad. For example, habitually going for a run at the same time every morning is good. On the contrary, drinking an energy drink at the same time every morning can be bad. Habits are formed over time, and eventually become second nature to a person’s routine, making them notoriously hard to break.

What may seem like a sugar craving after dinner might in-fact just be the result of a habit of always eating dessert. The brain has essentially trained itself to expect a hit of sugar at a certain time or after a certain trigger, and usually needs to be retrained to break the cycle.

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Aromatherapy Advice

What is aromatherapy?

The term “aromatherapy” was first coined by Rene-Maurice Gattefosse in 1937, soon after discovering the healing qualities of the lavender plant for burns. Aromatherapy is a type of holistic therapeutic practice that uses aromatic flowers and plant-based extracts and compounds, called essential oils, to alleviate pain and enhance physical and spiritual well-being. It is considered to improve mood and health, and harmonizes the body, mind and spirit.

Essential oils are aromatic plant compounds, which are derived from various parts of the plant, such as leaves, barks, and herbs. They are called “essential” because their essence contains the plant’s fragrance. They are often extracted by processes such as cold pressing, solvent extraction and embedding, but the most common process is distillation through steam.

As a fully qualified Aromatherapist with over 25 year’s experience I can advise you on what oils would suit you best for the problem you require help with.

Some of the things Aromatherapy may help with are insomnia sleeplessness nights, Stress relief: Stress caused by anxiety is possibly the most common and widespread ailment that afflicts us. Lavender, chamomile and bergamot are among some of the oils that help diminish anxiety, worrying and overthinking. Joint and muscle pains combined with a relaxing massage can be very effective. There are so many problems that can be helped that the list would be too long to write about here, so please reach out to me if you would like some advice I am always hear to help if I can. My email is dawn@dawnstherapies.co.uk

Dawn

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Crystal Guides

Turquenite Specimen

Malachite
Malachite is a stalwart protector and bolsterer of your strength and willpower. It helps you access your innate power and protects you from negativity as you take action in the world.

 Malachite

Black Tourmaline

Black tourmaline is ideal for clearing and protecting the aura from negative influences. It helps us connect to the Earth and know we belong here.

Black Tourmaline

Smoky quartz

Smoky quartz clears negative energies from the environment by grounding them in the Earth. It also serves as a general grounding stone, helping you integrate insights from higher vibrations by keeping your feet on the ground and helping you handle practical matters.

Smoky quartz

Amethyst

Curious about the metaphysical properties & spiritual meaning of amethyst? You’re not alone. The lovely purple amethyst gem is one of the most popular gemstones for jewellery and the one most associated with crystal healing. It is used for protection, intuition, spirituality, and helping to change bad habits or addictions.

 

Amethyst

 

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Working From Home

How to Successfully work from home

When it comes to working from home, there are a few typical personality types:

The procrastinator – “I’ll get to my work first thing this morning! Right after I rearrange my pantry and wipe down all my windowsills… and that other thing I need to do…”

The stickler – “Everything has its place on the desk, and I will be in my chair by 8.45am for a 9am start, and I won’t move from this spot.”

The easily distracted – “Alright, I’m going to send this email and… HEY KITTY! Want some pets?”

The bludger – “Yes sir, I’ll send that now.” *Answers call from boat*

If you’re any of these, here are some helpful and balanced tips for successfully working from home (except if you’re the bludger… you may need to find a new job).

Set up your workspace area

Not having any particular place you’re setting up and logging on can leave you a bit aimless when it comes to getting started in the morning. Choose a dedicated area in your house to set up everything you need for your work, allowing you to get up and take a break from that area when you need.

Stick to a routine

If you’re used to getting up and performing a morning routine every day, it’s a good idea to stick to it. Set your alarm at the same time you would normally and do all the things you would ordinarily do in the leadup to work. A lack of routine might mean you sleep in, neglect your health, and have trouble starting your day.

Remove distractions where you can

If you know you’re easily distracted or a procrastinator, remove any known triggers that might have you wandering from your work. Moving away from an area with a TV, keeping your pets separate to your workspace, or making sure your work area is clean and uncluttered will allow you the mental space to focus on your work.

Take regular breaks

When you’re not in a typical work environment where you’re prompted to take breaks or stop for an informal chat every now and then, make sure you set reminders for yourself. Taking time out from work and from a screen can help you restore some balance and reset yourself for when you return.

 Get dressed like you’re going to work

We’re all tempted to work in our slippers and pyjamas, and maybe skip the morning shower from time to time. But, getting up, showered, and dressed like you’re heading to work can help get you in the right mindset for a productive workday.

Steer clear of social media

Social media is the vortex of work distractions. The social aspect and endless waterfalls of content make it mighty tempting to surf for hours on end. Close and sign out of any social media tabs before starting your work, and only browse them when you’re taking a break.

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Me Time

Why you need to spend more time with yourself

Human beings are naturally social creatures. We gravitate towards others and often seek comfort and companionship to enrich our lives – and there’s nothing wrong with that!
But, setting aside time to be alone with yourself is just as important for your mental health and balance as building and maintaining those social connections.

Solitude has historically been tarred with a negative brush with it being used as punishment, seen as a sign of bad character, or leading to feelings of abandonment, but it’s not all doom and gloom!

Being alone by choice

Loneliness is a feeling no one enjoys and can often lead to negative health impacts.  We generally feel lonely when we’re not alone by choice
On the contrary, choosing to spend time doing things solo can have a big positive affect on your mental and physical health.

Benefits of spending time with yourself

It’s great for your imagination and creativity

In a world full of noise and distractions, zoning in on your own ideas and sense of creativity can sometimes feel impossible. Eliminating those distractions frees up your mind to explore and unpack ideas on a deeper and more detailed level, analysing them without influence or external pressures.

Our minds are capable of incredible things, and the imagination is where so many great ideas are born. By allowing ourselves the alone time needed to focus inward, we nurture and feed our imaginations and creative freedoms.

It can be great for relationships

Relationships are often viewed as the coming together of two people into one union, but it doesn’t mean you should never be apart! Allowing yourself and your partner to spend time doing things alone feeds your sense of identity and highlights how special your connections really are.

It promotes self-reflection

Taking time for some self-reflection is one of today’s most neglected activities because it needs to be done alone. Reflecting on your behaviour, ideas, decisions, challenging situations, and anything concerning the self can be incredibly therapeutic and cleansing, and often provides clarity to the mind.

Great activities to do on your own

Go for a long walk in nature 

Surrounding yourself with nature, away from technology and life distractions is a refreshing solo activity. Breathing fresh air and practicing mindfulness in your surroundings is great for your mental and physical health.

Try a new restaurant

Taking a leap and doing something new can also involve some seriously tasty food. Dining by yourself allows you to focus on your meal – the flavours, textures, and atmosphere of the restaurant. And no, you won’t look weird!

Go to the movies

Is there a movie coming out no one’s really interested in seeing? Perfect! Take yourself out to the cinema, grab some snacks, kick back and enjoy a film on your own. If you can do it alone from your couch, what’s stopping you from doing it at the big screen?

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Tips For Sober October

How to take a break from alcohol

For many, alcohol is a go-to substance to ease stress, relieve boredom, promote relaxation, or as a social lubricant. In many cultures, having a drink after work, with dinner, with a friend, or with a group is a perfectly acceptable (and sometimes expected) behaviour. But once you piece together all those drinks in all those settings, the amount you’re consuming might surprise and alarm you, and the effect on your health may be dangerous.

Taking a break from alcohol can give your body a much-needed rest from breaking down those toxins, and your mental health can also benefit.

Here are a few strategies for taking a break from alcohol.

Work out the ‘why’

Establish what your motivation for taking a break from alcohol is. It may be something like health, money, family, or relationships. Having a firm motivator is important to remind you of why you’re taking a break and the benefits that will follow.

Make a plan and keep yourself accountable

You may have a goal in mind for how long you want to kick the booze. It may be a month, six months, or indefinitely. Either way, it’s a great idea to write down a plan for how you’re going to replace alcohol in your routine, and what you’ll do in scenarios where you know you’ll be tempted.

Taking up a hobby such as sport or painting can be a healthy replacement for your 6pm drink and planning ahead for social occasions will mean you’re better prepared for temptations. If you feel like you’re going to cave in, always go back to your plan.

Find supporters and avoid peer pressure

If your circle of friends or family are regular drinkers, they may question your decision to take a break, and even tempt you to forget the whole idea. Peer pressure is a big factor that contributes to people’s decision to drink more quantities of alcohol more often than they ordinarily would.

It’s a great idea to find a friend or a few people to get on board with your choice and help support you through it. These individuals may also come to your assistance in social drinking settings or when you’re getting the third degree from others.

If you know your circle includes people that will pressure or question you, driving you to reconsider things, arm yourself with a handful of firm answers and statements for when you’re confronted, and stick to your guns!

Pay attention to how you feel

Taking a break from alcohol can have many health benefits for both body and mind. Pay particular attention to how you’re feeling and when you notice improvements such as more energy, less anxiety and depression, improved skin health, better sleep, and healthy weight loss.

The more you take stock of these benefits, the better equipped you are to keep going.

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Sleep Is Good For Us

How to get good quality sleep

A whopping 35% of us report regularly having trouble sleeping.

Your brain might decide to analyse all the problems of the universe as soon as you hit the pillow, or it might wake you up at some ungodly hour and will not be convinced to go back to sleep.

Regardless of the type of sleep interruption, it has a huge impact on many areas of your life from affecting your immune system to your cognitive function when performing any task.

Luckily, there are a few simple tools you can use to get good quality sleep and wake up feeling rested, restored, and ready to face the day.

Start a sleep routine and stick to it

If your bedtime is all over the place, it may be contributing to your lack of sleep quality. Without a regular sleep routine, your brain doesn’t consistently get the signal that it’s time to sleep, and your window of opportunity will close.

Aim to go to bed at the same time every night and wake up at the same time every morning. This will help to train your brain to properly recognise sleep cycles when it’s time to rest, and when you’ve had enough. Try to avoid long naps (especially in the afternoon) and stick to short power naps instead.

Treatments that aid relaxation

Some people find Reflexology Indian head Massage Reiki and Aromatherapy Massage help to relieve stress and tension thus aiding in a good nights sleep.

Ease up on the caffeine

Easier said than done for those of us who are fiends for caffeine, but monitoring your intake is vital to a good night’s sleep. Caffeine can come in many forms from your run of the mill coffee, to that can of soft drink you had with lunch. It can be tempting to use it to replace the energy you’re not getting from sleep but can have both immediate and long-term negative effects on your body.

Try to confine your caffeine intake to before lunch and avoid any caffeinated drinks after midday. This will help your body return to its normal energy levels by time you’re ready for bed.

Keep up with regular exercise

Exercising has an impressive list of benefits and improving your sleep quality is a major one. Exercising triggers the body to release some of our cortisol build-up (the stress hormone) and helps restore balance to your body’s hormone levels.

Exercise can also leave you feeling energised, so try to get your workout in early if you can, or at least a few hours before bed.

Create an environment that promotes sleep

You may look around your bedroom and start to notice a heap of distractions that affect your sleep. This may be background light/noise from a TV, using the wrong pillow, or a temperature that is too hot or too cold.

Make a list of everything in your environment you think might hinder sleep and start to change or remove them. This might mean replacing your TV with meditation music or leaving your phone out of arm’s reach to remove temptation. Assess your mattress, covers, and pillows, and work towards finding the right ones to suit you and your sleeping preferences.

 

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Tide Jewellery Inlaid Paua Shell

Tide Jewellery Inlaid Paua Shell

Tide Jewellery Inlaid Paua Shell Dragonfly Necklace & Earring Set in a Box

Ancient Maori people named Paua shell as “The gift of the God of the
sea.” It is often referred to as the “Sea Opal” due to its striking blues,
greens and fiery flashes and the iridescent patterns that change as they
catch the light. It is the most sought-after amongst the varieties of
Abalone, making each piece of jewellery unique.

Tide Jewellery® Paua shell is sustainably sourced as a by-product
from the Farmed Fishing Industry of New Zealand and is never
dredged or free fished. This Jewellery is tested against European
Regulations and the plated, or Stainless-Steel components, are
hypo-allergenic.

According to Maori practice, giving beautiful Paua shell is considered
extremely lucky and is believed to bring sensitivity, harmony,
prosperity, and peace to the wearer. Paua shells were used to treat ailments and health conditions including, deficiency of calcium,
hearing problems and nervous system disorders. Many traditional and
contemporary crafts of New Zealand use these shells and Paua shell
has always been an indispensable part of jewellery making.

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How We Use Reiki

Reiki distant healing

How We Use Reiki

If you have never heard of Reiki I will tell you a little bit about the energy that is transmitted through the Reiki practitioner. Whilst the client receives Reiki, the client normally lies on a couch fully clothed or sits on a chair whichever is comfiest. There can be a feeling of warmth tingling or a running sensation while receiving Reiki. All these things are normal no 2 treatments are the same. Reiki is being utilised more in hospital settings than ever before, there is now clinical evidence of the results that individuals feel after receiving Reiki. Reiki works in harmony with other medical treatments lessoning the side effects of cancer drugs, helping broken bones heal faster lessoning pain in ear infections there are just too many situations that can be helped with Reiki to discuss here, the possibilities are endless. I speak from personal experience working with Reiki energy for the past 23 years. If you would like to experience Reiki for yourself  I am based in Worsley Manchester. Reiki can also be sent through time and space distantly so if you cannot make it to my clinic you can book for a distant healing session instead.

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Prevention Is Better Then Cure

Family Size Bugs Away Oil 100ml

Prevention Is Better Then Cure

I would think that you have heard the old saying that prevention is better then cure, well it certainly is when it comes to insect bites.

They can turn into a very nasty infected area of skin. I have found that using Bugs Away oil  a natural insect repellent keeps those pesky little blighters at bay. This oil contains all natural products and is perfect for those nights in the garden when bugs and flies are all around.